Books

  • William H. Graves: El Gran Reto de la Educación: Equidad | Logro Académico | Rendición de Cuentas
    This 2013 publication is a compilation of my major papers from 2005-2012 translated into the Spanish Language. I'm indebted to my colleague, Joaquin Huerta, for his effort and kindness in conceiving and completing this project on behalf of our clients and colleagues in the Spanish-speaking world.
  • Larry Downes and Chunka Mui: Unleashing the Killer App

    Larry Downes and Chunka Mui: Unleashing the Killer App
    Economics Nobel Laureate Ronald Coase observed in the 1930s that that organizations were growing in size and, thus, becoming more bureaucratic, all because there was too much friction in externally acquiring the services and products necessary to the provision of an organization's core products and/or services. Downes and Mui make a persuasive case that the Internet changes that internally focused paradigm by removing the friction from external sourcing, thus enabling new "leaner, meaner" operational models in both the for-profit and nonprofit sectors. Downes' and Mui's "killer app" is Thomas Friedman's set of "flattenting" forces. (*****)

  • Steven D. Levitt: Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

    Steven D. Levitt: Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything
    Levitt asks interesting questions and uses statistical regression and his impressive habits of mind to answer them. I'd like to know what he might find if he asked why nonprofit higher education has not improved productivity in light of its major investments in information technology. (****)

  • Michael Treacy: The Discipline of Market Leaders: Choose Your Customers, Narrow Your Focus, Dominate Your Market

    Michael Treacy: The Discipline of Market Leaders: Choose Your Customers, Narrow Your Focus, Dominate Your Market
    Read this and then determine your institution's current "value discipline" -- and what it actually should be. Be honest! (*****)

  • Thomas L. Friedman: The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century

    Thomas L. Friedman: The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century
    This is must reading! Ask yourself how you would "flatten" higher education -- and your institution! (*****)

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August 28, 2005

Comments

No matter how much technology merges, the old computer saying still applys- "garbage in and garbage out" The output is just as good or bad as the input. Friedman in his book The World is Flat has only created a larger garbage truck.
As water seeks its own level, so does the workday even in the highest levels of sophistication. There will always be someone who will work for less and someone who will copy cat products without doing the hard parts from research and development to the finished product. In the USA is is becoming nonsensical to do the R&D especially if paid by the taxpayers and then have the production phase go outside the USA. In the end you have taxpayers paying to move their jobs some place else.
Friedman is a good example of one who does the talk without ever doing the walk and he ignores the fact that the workers who are the core of any economy have no voice in the process of Globalization. If Friedman's Flat World does evolve it will implode and his final book will be the Imploded World.
We now have a $200 device as the core of our classrooms. It is the PC computer which is now a throw-away item. How can this produce anything else but throw-away societies. It will always be garbage in and garbage out.
For more information, see http://tapsearch.com/tapartnews http://tapsearch.com/flatworld/id1.html
and "communcations by rank" - "if you are not part of any network, you do not exist".
http://www.experiencedesignernetwork.com/archives/000636/html

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